Visiting Relatives in Cullman Alabama

Traveling for us seems to always involve side trips to visit relatives. I guess it is just the thing we are supposed to do. A whole year goes by between vacation time, and we have to spend some of it visiting people we see only once a year at vacation time. I always am happy we stop to see relatives we do not see much after the fact. However, I do admit to thinking how much I would rather use the days for other things. We were looking at Cullman Alabama hotels reviews and booking information to make a trip to see my sister-in-law. I was, let’s say, less than enthusiastic about the side trip from our southern beaches vacation. I wanted to be on the water, in it or next to it the whole vacation, but I had to make sure my wife got to see her sister when we were headed south.

I figured two days out of two weeks would not be too much to ask. Don’t get me wrong. I get along perfectly with my wife’s sister and her husband.

How to Spot an Excellent Family Holiday Resort

One thing that many families love to do every year is get away on a family break. This is not only the chance to spend some quality tie together, but also the opportunity to broaden horizons by travelling abroad or to a new part of the country. Whether the holidaymakers want to relax or want to explore, a holiday is the perfect time to do these activities.

However, getting away on holiday can be very expensive and for this reason it pays to be very thrifty when you are looking for a good holiday on a budget. Here are a few tips on how to spot the best all inclusive family resorts anywhere in the world, ensuring you get value for money and you all enjoy your holiday together.

One of the first signs of the best all inclusive family resorts is the fact that they offer a lot of family friendly packages, and this means offering great value for money. The best resorts will know that families often have much tighter budget than other holidaymakers such as couples or singles. For this reason, look for a company that seems to offer a deal that was created with you in mind.

This can save you a significant amount of money, and considering that many packages include full board, excursions, accommodation and other bonuses, chances are you will have saved a great deal compared to having organised and booked everything separately yourself.

With that said, price is certainly not the only thing that indicates value for money, and you should also look at the variety of activities for both children and adults to see if the resort is really going to keep everyone in your family entertained.

Many of the best all inclusive resorts will often provide a number of different clubs and activities for children, whether these are dancing clubs, painting clubs, sports clubs or something entirely different. In any case, you can rest assured that your children will be occupied and also doing stimulating activities so adults can have their fun or relaxation elsewhere.

The best resorts will of course also serve adults and this is why you can often find lounge bars right by the swimming pool, excursions such as water sports or hiking trips and much, much more. The best resorts are the ones that cater to everyone in your family, so no one spends a boring moment there.

The next sign of quality to look for is that security is a top priority for the holiday resort you are considering. This is mostly because of the fact that kids and adults will be enjoying themselves separately and they also therefore parents can worry about their children’s safety.

There are some truly gorgeous resorts all over the world, yet not every country might feel very secure and therefore doing your research beforehand is important. Aim to find out the safety and security measures in place before you book, so that when you arrive you can let go of any worry and truly unwind.

You can often judge the resort that you are thinking of booking on the levels of security present as well as the variety of fun things to do, the reasonably priced packages and the careful consideration of everything that a family might need.

If you are unsure about how to go about finding a great resort such as the one mentioned here, present your travel agent with a list of your needs and requirements so that they can help you find the perfect break together as a whole family. When presented with a shortlist of options, you can then choose your resort based on the above guidelines as well as your own criteria.

The Power of a Checklist When Considering Vacationing

Regardless of how much time a person gives his or herself to begin the planning process for traveling, the day of departure seems to always sneak up. The key aspect to successful traveling is organization! There are many times where at least one thing is left behind, no matter how minor it may be, or how many times you “thought” the item was already accounted for. Planning for the days (and possibly week) prior to the departure day, the morning of, and last-minute, out-the-door packing is an essential responsibility to ensure that the trip starts out smoothly. Although there are times when help from others or past bad experiences does not motivate someone to plan ahead because of procrastination, having a checklist in hand can reduce the amount of stress that is caused by this last-minute rush.

Things to Do a Few Days Before You Leave

• Pay off your bills before you leave or schedule automatic payments for your bills. You definitely don’t want to be responsible for any late fees.

• Sort through your wallet and remove items you don’t need for your trip. Think foreign currency from your last trip, extra credit cards, or reward cards that only apply in your country of residence.

• Make copies of important items. Be sure to have copies of your passport and credit cards with you in case you lose them on your trip.

• Update your calendar. Be sure to check your work calendar to see what commitments you have made while you are gone. Reschedule them before you leave. Check what other non-work appointments you have.

• Put mail on hold. You don’t want strangers knowing that you’re away with the pile of newspapers at your door, so be sure to go to the USPS website to request to hold your mail, or speak with a neighbor about collecting and holding the mail while you are away.

• Call your bank. Let your bank or credit card provider know that you are going to be out of town so they should expect to see some charges from out of the area and will not put a “freeze” on our account to where you are unable to use it.

Things to Do the Day Before You Leave

• Arrange for care for your pets.

• Wash all dishes in the sink and run the dishwasher. Clean off all the kitchen counters and clean out the sink to be sure there is no food in the drain that could rot or attract bugs.

• Make sure all laundry is clean/pack clothes for trip.

• Water all plants.

• Get some cash out of an ATM, so you have it for last-minute travel needs.

• Charge camera/laptop/phone and all spare batteries.

Things to Do the Morning of Departure

• Close blinds and curtains.

• Double check that you have IDs and itinerary packed in carry-on bag.

• Make sure all windows are shut and locked.

• Take out garbage/recycling from every room in the house.

Out-the-Door To-Do’s

• Pack up any last-minute things you need to take (eyeglasses, retainer, water/snacks from refrigerator, phone, wallet, medicine).

• Turn off all power strips/unplug any electrical devices you won’t be using. This protects your electronics from power surge and reduces the energy use.

• Turn off the heater/air conditioner if you live somewhere temperate.

Once you finally shut the car door and pull out of the driveway and onto the street, the sense of relief overcomes you of not having to scurry around the house to gather last minute things, and you are now ready to begin your desired vacation. Without proper planning and organization, a vacation or trip can start out with negative motives, causing you or the people traveling with you to miss out on the excitement one should be acquiring from this intended memorable experience. By simply taking the time to create and follow a checklist, such as the one provided above, more value is added to the trip because you can ensure that you have all of the necessities as well as leave home with a positive outlook for the trip.

Five Reasons to Hire a Travel Agent

Planning a trip usually starts with a search of online options. However, you do not always get the best deal. In fact, if you contact a travel agent, you may be surprised at what he or she can do to make your vacation more enjoyable and more affordable. If you are still not sure, here are five good reasons you should make the call.

These Professionals Have Connections

Of course, when you go online you may think that you are getting the best deal because this site or that one collaborates with the different hotels and airlines to be able to offer a great price. That is not necessarily the case. Travel agencies actually team up with resorts, airlines, and hotels to get the best deals for their clients. These relationships are cultivated over many years.

Experience Adds Fun to Your Trip

A seasoned travel agent knows where the best spots are because he or she has taken the time to find out. While cultivating their connections, these professionals visit the locations and know first-hand where the best spots are. They also have tips on how to avoid busy lines in popular museums or find that diamond in the rough that might be overlooked on a search engine.

Knowledge Is Invaluable

In addition to having traveled to the areas in which they book, an experience travel agent has a wealth of knowledge about how to make your trip as stress-free as possible. This information can be invaluable to you and your family as you navigate to your destination. A good agency will also ensure their workers attend ongoing education training about the trends and technology to help expand their knowledge base. It will make the entire process much smoother for you.

A Travel Agent is Your Advocate

While your agent will do everything in his or her power to make your trip go as smoothly as possible, a problem may arise on occasion. If this happens, your booking agency can work for you to resolve the issues that you had. This is especially helpful if you are traveling to a foreign country and do not speak the language. If you decide to do all the booking yourself online, you are your own advocate and the issues may not be resolved easily.

Personal Service Makes for the Perfect Vacation

You can do all the searching you want, but an Internet site cannot listen to your needs or desires for your dream vacation. However, your agent is able to listen to what you want and help match you up with the right location. In fact, you could describe exactly what you want, thinking that you want to go to one location, and your specialist will point you in the direction of a completely different area. This new location may be a better fit for your desires.

How To Plan A Trip With Ageing Parents

Plan Ahead:

Planning is very important in travelling. Ask your parents where they want to go so they will feel good, pack lightly so that it will be easy to carry. It will be difficult for your parents to move with a wheelchair and for you to rush in a connecting flight so if possible book a direct flight.

Request travel approval from a physician:

If your ageing parents have any major health issue, be sure to get travel approval from his or her primary care physician. Find out if your parent requires any vaccinations or prescriptions prior to travelling. Keep documentation with contact information for doctors with you when you travel with your ageing parents in case of an emergency.

Make arrangements for any special need:

If your parent will require wheelchair at the airport or any special seating, contact the airline you are flying with and arrange for these considerations. Make your loved one wear shoes that can easily be taken off and put back on. Let the agents know about any surgical implants that may be detected when you are going through security.

Label all medications:

Be sure that all medication taken on a trip for your parents is clearly labelled with the name of medicine, dosage and administration instruction. The medications should be approved through airport security checkpoints. It will be easy for you to help your parents with their medication while you travel together.

Make arrangements for dietary needs:

Older adults have dietary restrictions; they can only enjoy the limited list of foods, so make sure there will be appropriate food available or you are taking some special food with you for your parents.

Provide your elderly parents a way to contact you:

Provide your parents a way to contact you just in case you get separated. Giving your parents a prepaid mobile phone is a great way to ensure that your parents can get in touch with you whenever it is necessary. Make sure that your parent has written down your cell phone number somewhere.

Proper time to rest:

Whenever you plan a trip you focus on enjoying as much as you can, but planning a trip with elderly parents you focus on the ways in which they are comfortable. Go out have a look at the world around you; try out new things with your parents. But make sure that you are giving your elderly parents a proper time to rest. Avoid scheduling anything late night as elderly individuals are early to bed so it will disturb them.

8 Tips for Camping in the Snow

Camping in the snow adds whole new fun and challenges to a normally routine camping trip. Obviously the colder and more serious the winter weather, the more gear you have to pack in. Telemark Skis, Skins, Snow Shoes, crampons, more layers, a thicker sleeping bag, the list goes on and on and before you know it your pack weighs 80 pounds. Well tis the season for snow camping, so I put together some tips to help the novice trying to camp in the snow for the first time or give some new tricks to the wild vet.

1. Prepare for the worst

With trails covered in ice and snow, it’s your job to determine how you are going make it to and from camp alive. Unlike in summer when trails are clearly recognizable, marked with signs, and plenty of people on trail, winter has zero people on trail and everything is under multiple feet of snow. Before you even step out the door, you need to do a detailed map study and know multiple prominent terrain features. Understand that even though it looks like a winter wonderland, it can turn into Hell very quickly. This time of year storms can white out the area within minutes and it’s very easy to become disoriented. Thick cloud cover and storms could also potentially throw off a GPS, so having the old map and compass ready could save your life. Don’t be scared to hunker down and wait out a storm. People have survived multiple days building a snow cave.

2. Getting to Camp- Skis vs Snow Shoes

Once you are ready to walk through a blizzard backwards, determine what method of travel you will use. Of course we all want to pick the snow mobile, but that’s not an option and we are definitely not post holing our way to camp. Cross Country Skis/Alpine Touring skis or Telemark skis are the fastest way to get to camp over fairly rough terrain. The back of the heel releases from the binding allowing you to walk in a sliding motion to ascend a mountain. With skins attached to the bottom of your ski, you can easily walk once you learn. You simply click the heel into the binding to ski downhill with AT skis. Teles are much harder to ski down hill and require a difficult lunging method. Skis can also be used to hold down a tent or help build a shelter. Although very efficient, skis can be very heavy and difficult to use at first. If a ski or binding breaks, it also much harder to fix than a strap on a snow shoe. Ski boots are terrible around camp, so you will need to pack in boots or your feet will freeze. Snowshoes although a much slower way to cover ground, they are the most practical for camping in the snow. Snowshoes can be used by anyone, clip into any boot, have crampon bottoms, are much lighter than skis and you can even make a pair with a little ingenuity. Although I prefer skis and a heavier pack, I recommend going with snow shoes for your first Snow camping trip.

3. Building the Perfect Camp/Shelter- Tent vs Bivy

Now that you have made it to camp, you can’t just whip out the old tent and throw it on the ground like it’s summer. Remember you are standing on multiple feet of snow. You need to pack down the snow or dig it out. This creates a nice solid foundation and usually blocks wind. Use your skis, snow shoes or shovel to pack the snow down enough to where you can jump on it without punching a hole. Or find an area with less snow, such as near the base of a tree and dig out the snow. Never sleep directly on the snow, use a ground pad! During the night the snow under your body will slowly melt and you will sink down. Well if you decided to just throw your tent down and climb in, the floor of your tent could potentially rip out. Your tent will probably decide to rip out from under you at about 2 am. Now all your gear is covered in snow and your freezing cold. Once you have the perfect foundation for a Bivy or Tent, prepare for weather. Gather fire making material just in case, even in places where fires aren’t permitted. Stake down your tent or bury tent lines in the snow. Build a snow fence wall out of rocks or branches for wind blown drifting snow. It is a terrible feeling and dangerous to wake up buried alive by snow in your bivy. It’s a mistake I will only make once. From my experience, a tent is very luxurious and it’s nice to be inside when the weather turns nasty, but I usually just roll with the bivy. It helps me cut down on weight and bulk in my bag and it usually makes me build up my campsite a little better.

4. Difficulty with Food and Water

Once camp is all set up, it’s time to sit down to a nice hot meal and refreshing drink of water. Then you open your Nalgene to a block of ice and your Jet Boil won’t light. Well just like your bottled water needs to insulted, so does a Jet Boil canister. Keep the canister near your body while hiking in, and use a small foam ground pad to cook on instead of placing the canister directly on the snow. Place your water bottles upside down in the insulating covers and the bottom will freeze before the top. Then you can take the remaining water to reheat the frozen water or use it to melt snow. You must have a small amount of water to melt snow. If you try to melt snow directly in a cooking stove it will just burn the snow. You can also add Gatorade or lemonade packets to your water to lower the waters freezing temperature. Also bring a lighter to light your Jet Boil, the ignitor on the Jet Boil seems to have the biggest problems. Jet Boil claims they work up to 26,000 feet. I’ve successfully used mine at 14,000 feet and it took about 4-5 minutes to boil water. If you decide to bring a mountain house, use the small pro-paks, they won’t expand at altitude. Also never eat snow if you are thirsty. It will only cause you to drop your core temperature and cause your body to work harder to warm you up, thus creating you to become more Dehydrated!

5. Take Care of Your Gear and Your Gear will Take Care of You

It is very important to stop a problem before it even starts while camping in the snow or below freezing temperatures. In summer it’s fine if your gear gets soaked by rain, but in winter wet gear can kill you. Down loses its insulating properties as it gets wet. Use a strong bristle brush to clean off any snow from your boots, outer layers of clothing, tent, etc. Snow will just keep accumulating like dirt if you don’t keep cleaning it off, and then all your gear ends up wet. Use vapor barriers for your sleeping bag and boots. Using vapor barrier socks can keep your feet from sweating into your boots, because the sweat will cause your boots to freeze by the morning. A vapor barrier for your sleeping bag can keep condensation from building up in your bag, and although I’ve never experienced it, potentially turn your sleeping bag into a frozen rock. Weather permitting turn your sleeping bag inside out everyday and allow it to dry in the sun on top your tent or from a tree limb. Get a black sleeping bag and it will soak up the heat very quickly. Change all your sweaty gear each night, especially your socks, gloves and beanie. Keeping all your gear as clean as possible and free of moisture will allow it to work efficiently.

6. Block the Sun and Wind

Even though it is 10 degrees below, you still need to protect yourself from the sun more than in the summer. In the snow you are being hit by sun rays from every direction due to the snow reflecting the rays. Always wear sunglasses or Goggles or you literally could go blind. Apply sunscreen in places you wouldn’t normally think such as under your chin or under your nose. It is extremely painful when the skin under your nose becomes dry, cracked, wind/sun burned and you keep rubbing it with your glove cause your nose is running. Everyday, throughout the day, you should apply lotion to your hands, face and feet to keep them from drying and cracking. Apply copious amounts of lip balm and wear wind protective gear such as balaclavas. Vaseline can also be used to trap heat or act as a wind barrier.

7. Keep the Snow Out

While you hike around all day in the snow, the snow will try to find its way into your boots, gloves, neck area, etc. Keeping the snow out will prevent unnecessary damp socks, glove liners or thermals. Wear pants with an elastic bottom that also have a cord to keep them down around your boots. Place snow Gaiters over top and you will prevent any snow from getting inside your boots. Make sure your outer layer glove also has a draw string to prevent snow from getting inside your glove while you work around camp. A neck gaiter and hood should prevent snow from entering around your neck. Stay dry to stay warm.

8. Pee before Bed and Have a Pee Bottle

This tip may seem ridiculous, but there is nothing more annoying than being completely bundled up and cozy in your sleeping bag and then you have to pee in the middle of the night. Not only will you lose the heat you built up in your sleeping bag, but you have to put on boots to go outside. It’s not the warm summer months, where you can quickly tip toe bare foot to a tree. Now it’s snowing with a steady wind outside and you have to put on boots, snow shoes, gloves, etc just to pee. So having a distinct bottle in your sleeping bag to pee in is a life saver. Ladies I’m sorry, but you may still have to leave the tent unless you have some incredible aim.

Camping in the snow is a wild and liberating experience. I hope these tips help you go camping more during this time of year! Feel free to share any tips or tricks you use while camping in the snow, I’d love to learn them. For more tips for staying warm this winter season check out my 5 tips to staying warm while camping in winter weather.

Camping Tent Materials And Choosing The Best

Camping can be lots of fun, but your experience depends on how prepared you are for the camping trip. The tent that you choose for your trip is among the most important factors that can play a role in the overall camping experience you and your family enjoy. Besides getting the right tent size and your most convenient style, you must think about the fabric that the tent is made of. There are several options and by knowing the pros and cons of each will put you in a better position to make a good choice.

Nylon

It is one of the most popular fabrics for tents and it is maybe because it is durable and strong, but remains lightweight thus making it easier to carry and store. The material is usually waterproofed and breathable hence it can allow vapor out and at the same time keep you dry. Your nylon tent won’t rot, but mildew can eat on the waterproof coating and when this happens then the tent is left un-useful. Even though uncoated nylon tents do not absorb any water, they are not waterproof. The material is commonly used on tent floors and fly sheets where light weight is needed. Compared to polyester it is a more expensive option.

Polyester

It is almost identical to nylon but the difference is that polyester does a good job resisting UV damage compared to nylon. The ultraviolet damage leads to weakening of the tent because it interferes with the strength of your tent material and even though it affects all tent materials, some experience faster damage than others. Polyester is more affordable and superior to nylon and when used for flysheet it sags less compared to nylon.

Cotton canvas

This all-weather material used to be a favorite for tent makers before nylon came to be. It is durable and is usually coated with waxing or an oily coating that prevented the absorption of water. The coating allows the tent to remain breathable but this material is not waterproof. You can still get the cotton canvas camping tents today, but they are becoming rarer by the day.

Polyethylene

The best thing about the material is that it is waterproof and will never allow water in unless there exists a hole in your tent. But even though it is durable, it is bulky and heavy and it gets tricky to get it back to original form after you have opened it. Camping tents might not be entirely made of polyethylene but you should make sure that your tent floor is made from it especially in wet seasons.

Rip-stop nylon

It differs from regular nylon because it has heavier fabric woven in between stitches. The extra reinforcement threads help in preventing tears on the tent from spreading so you have a durable family tent. This stitching might add a little weight to the tent, but it is worth because of the value it adds to your tent. It is among the best materials you can choose for your camping tent.

Simple Tips For The Big Lap

.. Includes Camping Etiquette

If you are one of the growing army of grey nomads doing the big lap, discovering, or hoping to discover, the joys of the open road in this wonderful country, then this is for you. Whether you are a baby boomer travelling indefinitely, choosing to spend the winter months up north, or simply enjoying a few short trips a year, you are part of the growing grey nomad community in Australia. Whether you are travelling in a caravan, motor home, camper van, camper trailer, fifth wheeler or a tent, this is the place to read about people like yourselves… and about the issues affecting the grey nomad lifestyle in Australia.

Planning a grey nomad journey in the caravan or RV? Or maybe a camping trip? Before you get going, there are a few things to think about: where you will go, who is coming and what other bits and pieces you will be taking.

Once that’s all in order, here are some awesome tips and tricks every grey nomad or camper should know. They will help you navigate the road, have a great camping trip and get a little crafty.

Bring along a multi-charger so you can charge more than just your phone!

Find the cheapest petrol prices on your route with the travelling apps.

Use a cereal container and plastic bag as a spill-proof rubbish holder.

Wrapping your meat in cabbage leaves will keep it from getting burnt to a crisp.

A Tic Tac box makes a great miniature tackle box.

Add sage to your campfire or fire pit to keep mosquitoes and bugs away.

Buy a dry erase board and place at the back of the cupboard. Write the name, address, spot number and phone number of the camping grounds in case of emergency.

Your deodorant doubles as a mosquito bite itch reliever.

Cobble together a makeshift shower using a large water jug and a watering can head.

Place foam tiles on the floor of your tent for a softer and more comfortable night’s sleep.

Point a headlamp or other strong light into a clear water container for a light without glare.

An empty 2 litre milk carton filled with water works well for this.

Keep power cord connections off damp ground and protected from rain using an upside down bucket with two holes.

Most Importantly remember camping etiquette:

Clean up after you leave the camp site and…

Dispose of your garbage in the bins provided or take all of your garbage with you.

Take away any grey water if possible and dispose of it in a proper location.

For campers who use a chemical toilet never release the contents of the toilet in an open area near your campsite. Chemical toilet discharges should be done only at an approved facility.

Leave your campsite as clean as you found it. In fact, leave it cleaner than you found it.

Camping is one of the most enjoyable things that people can do together. As you travel and camp in this great country you will be inspired by the beauty Therefore, be considerate of your fellow camper, the community nearby, and of God’s creation.

Tips for Camping With Just an ATV

There is nothing more peaceful than sitting around a campfire enjoying a night under the stars or snuggled up in a tent telling ghost stories. But, some of the most beautiful places to camp are only accessible by an All-Terrain Vehicle. Whether it’s a weekend getaway or a month-long adventure, preparing and packing for an ATV camping trip can be overwhelming. It’s not just the destination that counts, it’s also the equipment you choose to take (or don’t take). Here are a few tips on having an amazing camping trip by only taking what can fit on your ATV.

1. Plan in Advance

Camping with an ATV can pose a few more kinks than a normal camping trip. Because of this, it is important to plan a little more extensively. Have a map on hand so that you can easily tell where you are going and to help you get back on track should you lose your way. As you would get your car or SUV inspected before a long road trip, the same needs to be done for your ATV. And with any planned vacation, always have a back-up plan. No matter how hard you try to prepare, things happen!

2. Pack Smart:

Taking only your ATV means you will need to pack only the essential items. Prioritizing your packing list will make carrying a limited amount of gear and supplies much easier. So, what are the must-haves for an ATV camping trip?

Safe equipment
Sleeping bag
Tent
Clothing
Weather specific gear
Food
Cooking equipment
Tools

3. ATV Top-Shelf Rack:

The Top-Shelf can carry anything from boats to lumber to camping gear. With all of its accessories, you can go anywhere, do anything, and bring whatever you want with you. It is great for hauling lumber and supplies around your farm, carrying your camping gear to the top of the mountain, hauling kayaks from the hard to reach river banks, or anything else you can think of. Add-ons allow you to convert your ATV into a hunting blind, barbwire winder or boom wench. All this can be done while toting your gun, bow, or shovel with the secure bracket.

4. Pack Simple Meals:

Bring simple meals that can easily be cooked over a fire or that require no cooking or refrigeration such as freeze-dried meals, instant oatmeal, granola bars, and canned goods. All of these produce nothing to clean up after and they all cook up quickly with boiling water.

5. Focus on the Beauty:

There will be moments when you miss the conveniences of your usual camping equipment but, ignore the inconveniences and focus on the beauty of the scenery. To fully understand and embrace your surroundings, take time to get off your ATV and explore by foot.

Getting a group together on a camping trip with just an ATV can help build lasting memories. If done right, they can be a huge adventure and they may become your go-to camping style after a few practice runs. Above all else, when going camping, be aware of your surroundings and be safe!

3 Best Ways to Invest in a Safe Trip

Sometimes we have to save money for years to afford a trip of our dreams. When we are finally there, we’d rather spend that precious money on fun and impressions than on paying medical bills or lost belongings compensation. For that sake, it’s better to do some investments prior to the trip to avoid much bigger spending afterwards.

1. Buy reliable and high-quality gear

When you leave abroad, you think of seeing, hearing, tasting and experiencing new culture and not of a torn backpack and callosities on your feet. Make sure to wear appropriate clothes and shoes, buy or borrow a good suitcase or backpack, raincoat, sunglasses, etc. They are all easier and cheaper to buy in your home city then abroad. Don’t rely on your old stuff to live through one more trip, because it might not. And this may affect both your travel budget and your health.

2. Take out Travel Insurance

Yes, you have researched your travel destination well, and yes, you are always careful and cautious. But this hardly eliminates the chances of you or your travel companion getting ill during the trip, your baggage getting delayed, lost or stolen, or anything else you might not expect. Dozens of your trips can be perfect but you never know whether your next one will not require a travel insurance, so don’t risk and you’ll thank yourself later for that.

Choosing the right insurance policy isn’t that tedious and difficult and insurers are constantly improving their websites to make them easy to follow. Visit several travel insurance websites, see through the policy features, compare, ask questions if you have doubts, and buy what suits you the best. Like many other spheres, insurance providers sometimes offer discount, loyalty programs, contests and special deals, so you truly have a chance to save on being safe.

Another option you might be interested in is excess waiver. For example, the travel insurance policy states you should spend £50 for fixing your broken mobile device to get this spending compensated. Having purchased this extension, you’ll get rid of that limit and have every penny compensated if needed to.

3. Make Sure to have the Internet Access abroad

Nowadays, mobile apps and various services help us everywhere and this is especially valuable abroad. The trip gets way better when Google reminds you the time and date of your flight, navigation app shows what roads you’d better avoid and in what guesthouse you’d better stay. There is so much out there to make your life happier and easier, so just reach out and take it.

Plan you trip well, invest in it wise, and travel safe!